iBio 101

iBio101 short clips are selected especially for high school and undergraduate students.


Name and Affiliation Title Run Time Description
Bonnie Bassler Bonnie Bassler
Princeton University
Bacterial Communication 10:24 min Bassler describes how bacteria use chemical signals to talk to each other. This communication allows them to act as a unified group and accomplish tasks they could never accomplish as individual cells.
Mary Beckerle Mary Beckerle
University of Utah
Cancer Development 7:11 min Cancer is the result of the derangement of control pathways that usually keep cell growth in check. Beckerle explains how changes in our genes are ultimately responsible for this out-of-control cell growth.
Mary Beckerle Mary Beckerle
University of Utah
Genetic Variability in Cancer 5:39 min Many different genes are turned on or off in different types of cancer and in different patients. In some cases, different genes are affected even in the same tumor types. A better genetic understanding of cancer may lead to new strategies for patient care.
Elizabeth Blackburn Elizabeth Blackburn
University of California, San Francisco
Telomeres 12:30 min Telomeres are short, G rich DNA repeats that cap the end of each chromosome. Dysfunctional telomeres result in genomic instability. Blackburn explains how functional telomeres prevent modification of chromosome ends and maintain chromosome length.
Elizabeth Blackburn Elizabeth Blackburn
University of California, San Francisco
Telomerase 6:00 min Telomerase is a unique cellular reverse transcriptase that has the vital role of maintaining telomeric DNA at the end of chromosomes. Blackburn and colleagues were awarded the 2009 Nobel Prize in Medicine for their work on telomeres and telomerase.
Carolyn Bertozzi Carolyn Bertozzi
University of California, Berkeley
Human Blood Groups 3:51 min The discovery that sugars on the surface of human blood cells determine blood groups (A, B, AB, and O), had a huge impact on modern medicine.
Carolyn Bertozzi Carolyn Bertozzi
University of California, Berkeley
Influenza Virus Infection 12:22 min Bertozzi gives a brief introduction to the flu virus, including how it infects cells and how drugs such as Relenza or Tamiflu work.
Carolyn Bertozzi Carolyn Bertozzi
University of California, Berkeley
Inflammatory Diseases 4:34 min The binding of white blood cells to the walls of blood vessels is often a first step in inflammatory diseases such as arthritis and asthma. The initial attachment is mediated by sugars and sugar binding proteins on the surface of both the blood cells and blood vessels.
Elaine Fuchs Elaine Fuchs
Rockefeller University
Embryonic Stem Cells 7:41min Fuchs defines embryonic stem cells, outlines how they are obtained experimentally, and explains why scientists are excited about their great potential for regenerative medicine.
Elaine Fuchs Elaine Fuchs
Rockefeller University
Embryonic Stem Cells: Ethical Considerations 6:22 min In this lecture, Fuchs examines the controversy surrounding the use of embryonic stem cells for research.
Elaine Fuchs Elaine Fuchs
Rockefeller University
Nuclear Transfer Research 10:40 min The transfer of the nucleus from an adult cell into an enucleated oocyte can generate stem cells that go on to produce healthy mice. While this technology holds promise for regenerative medicine there are still many hurdles to clear.
Elaine Fuchs Elaine Fuchs
Rockefeller University
Adult Stem Cells 20:26 min Adult stem cells regenerate a specific set of cells such as skin or blood. Fuchs focuses on skin stem cells and the success of using epidermal cells grown in vitro to treat burn patients.
Elaine Fuchs Richard Losick
Harvard University
Spore Formation in Bacteria 3:03min Losick uses a very nice animation to illustrate the complex series of steps that the bacteria Bacillus subtilis undergoes during spore formation. It is a fascinating example of development and differentiation in a simple organism.
Susan Lindquist Susan Lindquist
Whitehead Institute
Protein Folding and Prion Disease 13:40 min Proteins are folded into intricate, complicated shapes (see Steve Mayo’s iBio101) and misfolding often results in disease. Lindquist describes how prions catalyze protein misfolding resulting in diseases such as Mad Cow Disease. She also gives a great explanation of why budding yeast (S. cereviseae) is such a wonderful lab tool.
Steve Mayo Steve Mayo, California Institute of Technology Protein Structure 2:41 min Proteins are the key to most cellular processes. Mayo gives examples of some of the complex structures into which different proteins can fold.
Ira Mellman Ira Mellman
Genentech
The Immune Response 12:19 min The immune response is quite amazing in its ability to provide protection against the bacteria, viruses, and toxins that invade our bodies while not harming us. Mellman accompanies his description of the immune response with engaging video and animation.
Jeremy Nathans Jeremy Nathans
Johns Hopkins University
The Vertebrate Eye 10:14 min Nathans gives an overview of the vertebrate eye starting with the entire visual system and working down to photoreceptor cells, the visual pigment rhodopsin and finally the chromophore retinal.